Remember this post?  When I declared that I’d no longer be buying mayonnaise?  Ever again. Well, I haven’t. And I’ve been delving into all manner of mayonnaise recipes online and in books, in search of the perfect one ever since.  I’ve resurrected curdled mayonnaise’s more times than I’d like to admit (I’ve included my favorite remedy, below) and I’ve experimented with only egg yolks, egg yolks plus one egg, lemon juice vs. cider vinegar, by hand vs. blender vs. food processor vs. hand blender.  I studied Child, and Ruhlman.  And over the past few months I’ve really figured out the flavors and technique that I prefer. And it surprised me. And then I decided to make it lacto-fermented, so that it would last in the fridge for six to eight weeks, just [... To read more, click here ...]

 

There are two standards of quality for me when it comes to a good Mexican restaurant. First, refried beans. Beans must be offered and they must be refried. Not black beans, not some low-cholesterol offering, but real refried beans, preferably cooked in lard and topped with queso fresco must be served. You got bad beans? I won’t be returning. Second, escabeche. If I go to a taco stand or Mexican restaurant and they have a little bowl of escabeche on the table or included with their salsa selection I’m a happy girl. I know I’m in. I’d rather frequent a sketchy Mexican restaurant with good beans and escabeche than a beautiful one that markets their black bean wraps with avocado puree and fishbowls of margaritas, thank you very much. Which [... To read more, click here ...]

Jul 252009
 

Do you know what this means? This was my last jar of mayonnaise. The one that I bought moving in to get us by. The one that I bought in the smallest jar they had so that we would use it up quicker. The only mayonnaise I’ve ever known. (Ahhh, Best Foods/Hellmans I love you so. Why do you have to be made with rancid oils that aren’t good for us?)Remember back, oh, early January with all our New Years resolutions? I’d resolved then to try to make some lacto-fermented condiments this year. The ones we really use, like ketchup and mayonnaise. And then all craziness ensued with a loss of job, gypsy-living for five months, a new baby, a new job in a new state in a new house. [... To read more, click here ...]

 July 25, 2009  Posted by Heartland Renaissance ,  Comments Off
Jun 302008
 

I always buy my avocados from the same family’s booth at my Saturday Farmer’s Market. Run by a married couple, their young son often plays with my little guy while I choose which two avocados I want for the weekend (ripe, with a bit of give to them) and which two I want to buy to make something with for later in the week. They have a 3/$4 listed price but we have a 4/$5 agreement every week. I’m a repeat customer. Though avocados are their primary seller, they often frequently sell traditional, hard to find Latin-American fruits and vegetables, like chayote and nopales, along with a range of citrus fruits. One day I realized that the proprietor’s son had handed over a small, bright orange kumquat to John and [... To read more, click here ...]

 

The one condiment I can not seem to keep in the house is salsa. I think my husband must eat it for breakfast. I buy it on sale for the pantry, next time I go to get a jar out, they’re all gone. I open a new jar and eat a little bit with lunch, by the weekend there’s only a teaspoon left. My husband can easily go through four or five cups of salsa in a weekend of football games. And not only do we eat it with chips, and on things like tacos or quesadillas, but we have it with eggs, a cup or so mixed in with vegetable beef stew in the wintertime, a dash added to a spaghetti sauce that needs some oomph, and marinate shrimp [... To read more, click here ...]

Log in here!